The jolly festival of Purim is celebrated every year on the 14th of the Hebrew month of Adar (late winter/early spring). It commemorates the salvation of the Jewish people in ancient Persia from Haman’s plot “to destroy, kill and annihilate all the Jews, young and old, infants and women, in a single day,” as recorded in the Megillah (book of Esther).     Feb 28-Mar 2
The 15th of Shevat on the Jewish calendar—celebrated this year on Wednesday,—is the day that marks the beginning of a “new year” for trees. Commonly known as Tu Bishvat, this day marks the season in which the earliest-blooming trees in the Land of Israel emerge from their winter sleep and begin a new fruit-bearing cycle.   Jan 31
The eight-day festival of Passover is celebrated in the early spring and commemorates the emancipation of the Israelites from slavery in ancient Egypt. In Hebrew it is known as Pesach (which means “to pass over”), because God passed over the Jewish homes when killing the Egyptian firstborn on the very first Passover eve.  Apr 19 -27, 2019.
Shavuot 2019 (a two-day holiday, coincides with the date that God gave the Torah to the Jewish people at Mount Sinai more than 3,300 years ago. It comes after 49 days of eager counting, as we prepared ourselves for this special day.    June 8-10
We are now celebrating Simchat Torah, and have listed Psalms specifically for this holiday. God gives us His Words to use in worship and prayer to help us receive the blessings and the revelation associated with these appointed times.



Worship and Pray with these Psalms during
Simchat Torah
Please check back as we will be posting other Psalms for all holidays,
and Thank You for looking in.
Psalms for Sukkot     84;  27
Following the seven joyous days of Sukkot, we come to the happy holiday of Simchat Torah.  We dwell in the sukkah, during which we complete and immediately begin the annual Torah reading cycle. This joyous milestone is marked with dancing, traditionally following seven circuits known as hakafot, as the Torah scrolls are held aloft.  Sept 30-Oct 2
Psalm 119

9  How can a young man cleanse his way? 
     By taking heed according to Your word.

11  Your word I have hidden in my heart,
        that I might not sin against You.

16    I will delight myself in Your statutes; 
         I will not forget Your word.

17    Deal bountifully with Your servant,
          that I may live and keep Your word.

25    My soul clings to the dust;
         Revive me according to Your word.

28    My soul melts from heaviness;
         Strengthen me according to Your word. 

172  My tongue shall speak of Your word,
          For all Your commandments are righteousness.


Chanukah is the Jewish eight-day, wintertime “festival of lights,” celebrated with a nightly menorah lighting, special prayers and fried foods.  The Hebrew word Chanukah means “dedication,” and is thus named because it celebrates the rededication of the Holy Temple.   
Dec 2-10
Next Major Holiday
Sukkot is a weeklong Jewish holiday that comes five days after Yom Kippur. Sukkot celebrates the gathering of the harvest and commemorates the miraculous protection G-d provided for the children of Israel when they left Egypt. We celebrate Sukkot by dwelling in a foliage-covered booth (known as a sukkah) and by taking the “Four Kinds” (arba minim), four special species of vegetation.  Sept 23-30
Rosh Hashanah is the birthday of the universe, the day G-d created Adam and Eve, and it’s celebrated as the head of the Jewish year.      Sept. 9-11
Yom Kippur is the holiest day of the year—the day on which we are closest to God and to the quintessence of our own souls. It is the Day of Atonement—“For on this day He will forgive you, to purify you, that you be cleansed from all your sins before God” (Leviticus 16:30).    Sept 18-19
Days of Awe    Psalms 78-83
Following the seven joyous days of Sukkot, we come to the happy holiday of Simchat Torah.  We dwell in the sukkah, during which we complete and immediately begin the annual Torah reading cycle. This joyous milestone is marked with dancing, traditionally following seven circuits known as hakafot, as the Torah scrolls are held aloft.  Sept 30-Oct 2